#369 Survival Medicine Hour: Blisters, Bacteria, Baking Soda, More

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#369 SURVIVAL MEDICINE PODCAST

The world is on the brink of destruction and you have all your preps together; You’ve got water, food, you can start a campfire, you’ve got your knife or knives, and you’ve provided for the common defense. You can sterilize water, your vehicle ready for the road if you need to go and your ducks are all in a row. Duck is good eating, by the way.

Well, how about some baking soda? Joe Alton MD goes solo this week to talk about just some of the medical and other uses of this versatile item.

Plus, how to identify, treat, and prevent common trail mishaps like blisters and splinters off the grid. Add to that some news about the invasive species the northern snakehead, which has reared its ugly, well, snakehead, for the first time in Georgia! And Tokyo is hit with a typhoon and an earthquake on the same day! Ouch!

Lastly, a history of bacteria and human knowledge, as well as some amazing (and a little scary) development or two with ramifications for our future!

All this and more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton MD (Amy’s folks came down to visit this week)

To Listen in, click below:

https://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2019/10/12/survival-medicine-hour-blisters-bacteria-baking-soda-more

Joe Alton MD

Make sure to check out our medical kits and supplies at store.doomandbloom.net. You’ll also find our Survival Medicine Handbook and Alton’s Antibiotics and Infectious Disease: The Layman’s Guide… at amazon.com!

Find our books on Amazon or at our store!

Hey, don’t forget to check out our entire line of quality medical kits and individual supplies at store.doomandbloom.net. Also, our Book Excellence Award-winning 700-page SURVIVAL MEDICINE HANDBOOK: THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE FOR WHEN HELP IS NOT ON THE WAY is now available in black and white on Amazon and in color and color spiral-bound versions at store.doomandbloom.net.

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